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Archive for the ‘Post publication peer review’ Category


A little late this year, but then there are many calendars, so it is surely the start of the New Year for someone, somewhere, today.

Three years ago I made a simple resolution for the New Year, which was not to review for commercial closed access journals. I developed this in 2015 (and here) when I decided to change my publishing priorities and avoid commercial closed access journals.  This was pretty much already happening, so painless. My two caveats relating to publication are important, if you collaborate extensively, simply because many colleagues live in countries where Impact Factor rules their lives. Thus, when I am not the PI and in editorial control of the work, but merely a contributor, then I suggest alternatives, but I do not dig my heels in. For my students and postdocs who originate from these many countries the Learned Society and Open Access alternatives have pretty much solved the problem, in that they have decent impact factors, and their career progression will not be impeded.

I have also been experimenting with preprints for some time and now, along with Open Data. So the 2016 resolution adds preprints and Open Data. All papers where I am sole PI and have, therefore, the full decision-making power on publication (and also full responsibility for the paper) will be first submitted as preprints and data will be fully accessible.

What is interesting is the development of the change in publication culture. There are still many wedded to the notion that the “Top” journals are those with the highest impact factor, despite the fact that there is no evidence to support this conclusion. Witness the article in Nature reporting the excellent decision by the Gates Foundation, which stipulates that worked funded by the Gates Foundation cannot be published in journals that are not properly open access and open data compliant. To paraphrase the Nature headline:

“Shock Horror, Gates stops researchers publishing in Top journals aka ours”.

The implication that a paper in Nature is worth more than one in The Biochemical Journal or PlosOne to name two other good journals of many is ludicrous. Only when the paper is read can one decide whether it is excellent, good or poor, and then it takes time (=years) for the full scientific impact to be recognised. There are plenty of papers in ALL journals that are worse than poor, ample evidence is provided by a quick scan of Pubpeer; Nature for one has a lot to do to put its house in order.

So preprints and Open Data it is. I would encourage all my colleagues to follow suit.

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I made my first New Year’s resolution on December 31, 2013: to only undertake reviews for open access and learned society journals.  This I have stuck to well, as I noted a year later for the simple reasons that it makes sense and it frees up my time.

Today I had a request to review a manuscript for Nature Publishing Group’s Scientific Reports, and I realised that I need to clarify my position.

I am on strike. (more…)

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During a quick scan this morning of the “recent” comments on Pubpeer, an activity that I pursue regularly, as part of my reading, there seemed to be a lot more author responses.  So I counted.

70 articles featured with comments.

10 of these had an author response.

This is progress. I have no data, but my impression is that a year ago author comments were far rarer, maybe 1% or thereabouts. Now we are at 14%. Let’s hope this is not an anomaly, but a trend, and maybe in a few years papers without author responses will be in the minority.

Regardless of arguments about anonymity, etc., post publication peer review is growing, which is a sign of health in the scientific enterprise.

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I went to a most useful talk this morning by Stephen Carlton (@LivUniOA) on the Univeristy repository. I had whinged about this as being nearly unusable, but then I jumped in on an early version.

The repository is now useable, though it is quirky. A few lessons from my efforts to update my entries.
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I am a fan of PubPeer, as it provides a forum for discussion between authors and the wider community, something I have discussed in a number of posts (two examples being here and here). Two days ago, My colleague Mike Cross came by my office, having just delivered a pile of exam scripts for second marking (it’s exam and marking season), asking if I had seen a comment on our paper on PubPeer. I had not – too many e-mails and too busy to look at incoming!
So I looked at the question, which relates to panels in two figures being identical in our paper on neuropilin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) – indeed they are labelled as being identical.
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Discussion surrounding post publication peer review (previous post here seems to be growing and one issue that is frequently raised is anonymity. In a PLOS Medicine editorial Hilda Bastian argues that current post publication peer review is over focussed on what apparently is wrong in papers and that anonymity is a threat to effective post publication peer review.
A PubPeer thread takes issue with these and some other points and I have also joined in (I am Peer2). We should remember that any notion of power has nothing to do with scientific capability – indeed there may even be an inverse relation. So providing those with the least power (so the most disenfranchised) a means to participate in post publication peer review is essential. Though we have no data on PubPeer, PubMed Commons is a venue for the established. There are some critiques, there is also a fair amount of hagiography too. I would hazard a guess that PubPeer is far more diverse in terms of the career stage of participants and in terms of their gender/social group. Certainly my anecdotal evidence suggests as much, and that is all I have to go on. (more…)

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Sometime last night this blog received its 50,000th page view. I write this blog because I like to. That others find the content worth reading at times is lovely, thank you.

What has been read the most and the least? (more…)

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